Almond Pulp

How to Make Almond Flour

It's not hard to make your own almond flour, and if you make almond milk you're already half way there because you can use the leftover pulp. You can either buy almond flour, or do as I prefer and make it yourself from the pulp left over from making almond milk, or grind your own from whole almonds in a food processor or coffee grinder. Read more »

Wheat Fast Low Carb Cookbook_

This book was a free kindle book for a couple of days when I first posted this article (the freebie special is over now). I literally just got it so I haven't had a chance to try any of the recipes yet. At a glance flicking through it many look interesting enough to try. It has very gotten good reviews. The first part of the book has what almost looks like a summary of the information in the very well researched and eye-opening book Wheat Belly by William Davis MD that I have been reading. I'll be posting a review of it when I finish and more articles that talk about how wheat affects our body. But let me just say here, for anyone who is interested in eating healthier, I think the book Wheat Belly should be mandatory reading. Now, getting back to the book Wheat Fast Low Carb Cookbook let me tell you a little more about the recipes at a glance... Read more »

This savory wild rice pilaf recipe is so delicious I usually eat half of it while I'm making a stir-fry to go on top of it. No kidding! If you want to make rice to go with any dish, but want something a little more special than just plain brown rice, try this! If you are trying to reduce salt in your diet you can leave out the salt in this recipe, this seasoning mix still gives you a really flavorful pilaf. You can also make it with just brown rice if you don't have wild rice available, just use 2 cups of brown rice. This cooks just like brown rice. I cook it in my 6-cup rice cooker, and it comes out perfect, but you can also cook it in a saucepan. What I like about the rice cooker is that you just set it up and it manages itself. Read more »

Young coconut meat with chili and lime

This simple, nutritious dish is commonly found in markets and roadside stands in Mexico and is often called Cocos Preparados. It would be easy to make at home as well, as long as you have access to young coconuts and a way to cut them open. It's filling and tasty, combining the four flavors, sweet (coconut), sour, piquant and salty. Young coconut meat is low in calories, an 11-ounce serving contains only 65 calories. That same serving size contains 50% of the daily recommended dose of manganese, which assists in blood clotting and connective tissues. One serving also contains 15% of the daily recommended allowance of potassium, which helps to keep your muscles and digestive system healthy. A serving will also supply you with 6% of your daily recommended dose of magnesium, which is vital to healthy functioning of kidneys, muscles and energy production. It's also important in maintaining mineral and vitamin levels. Be sure to drink the coconut water […] Read more »

Kombucha tea

Kombucha is a tart and refreshing fermented beverage with a taste reminiscent of apple cider. It is loaded with beneficial yeast and bacteria that will help re-establish your healthy gut bacteria. In fact the weird, gel-like kombucha culture that resembles a jellyfish, is called a SCOBY. That's an acronym for Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria and Yeast. Kombucha is an ancient, home-made folk remedy. It was very popular in Russia and Eastern Asia. It was reportedly used by the Chinese 2,000 years ago. In the early 1950s Russian scientists did quite a bit of research into the beneficial properties of kombucha with respect to treating cancer after finding that there was an extremely low incidence of cancer among the people of certain regions, even though pollution and environmental toxins in those regions were so bad the trees and fish were dying. The scientists were doing a really thorough study of the food that was consumed and other reasonable habits these people […] Read more »

Raw Sesame Tahini

I think this is a better way to make raw sesame tahini than my previous raw tahini recipe. It is very close, in both taste, texture and consistency, to ‘normal' tahini, and it will keep for much longer too. It takes a longer to make, but only requires a bit more effort since most of that extra time is dehydrating the sesame seeds. Considering you can make a larger batch at a time, because it will keep for longer, I think it's well worth the extra effort. Sesame seeds are very high in calcium, but the problem with eating them whole is they often pass right through your digestive tract without being assimilated at all. Tahini (ground sesame paste) is a great way to consume sesame seeds because it's so much easier to digest and assimilate. Normally the sesame tahini you find in stores is not raw. The sesame seeds have been toasted prior to making the tahini. I've found […] Read more »

Roasted Sweet Potato with Rosemary & Orange

Roasting sweet potatoes really brings out their natural sweetness and almost caramelizes them and the addition of orange juice, mandarin slices and fresh rosemary works with the flavor of the sweet potatoes to create a subtle but very tasty dish. It's great served warm or cold the next day. It's really filling too, I'll often have just this and a big salad. In New Zealand, sweet potatoes are commonly called kumara, and they were brought here by the first settlers, the Maori for whom they were an important staple crop. They come in a variety of different colors, which all have slightly different flavors, but any kind can be used for this recipe. Read more »